Alice in wonderland

 

Chapter I
There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!"

Chapter I
However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high.

Chapter I
It was all very well to say "Drink me," but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. "No, I'll look first," she said, "and see whether it's marked 'poison' or not".

* * *

Chapter II
"Curiouser and curiouser!" cried Alice (she was so much surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English); "now I'm opening out like the largest telescope that ever was! Good-bye, feet!"

Chapter II
Alice felt so desperate that she was ready to ask help of anyone; so, when the Rabbit came near her, she began, in a low, timid voice, "If you please, sir" - The Rabbit started violently, dropped the white kid gloves and the fan, and scurried away into the darkness as hard as he could go.

Chapter II
"I wish I hadn't cried so much!" said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out.

Chapter II
Everything is so out-of-the-way down here, that I should think very likely it can talk: at any rate, there's no harm in trying." So she began: "O Mouse, do you know the way out of this pool? I am very tired of swimming about here, O Mouse!"

* * *

Chapter III
"What I was going to say," said the Dodo in an offended tone, "was, that the best thing to get us dry would be a Caucus-race."

Chapter III
However, it was over at last, and they sat down again in a ring, and begged the Mouse to tell them something more.

* * *

Chapter IV
Before she had drunk half the bottle, she found her head pressing against the ceiling, and had to stoop to save her neck from being broken.

Chapter IV
"That you won't!" thought Alice, and, after waiting till she fancied she heard the Rabbit just under the window, she suddenly spread out her hand, and made a snatch in the air.

Chapter IV
She drew her foot as far down the chimney as she could, and waited till she heard a little animal (she couldn't guess of what sort it was) scratching and scrambling about in the chimney close above her: then, saying to herself, "This is Bill," she gave one sharp kick, and waited to see what would happen next.

Chapter IV
Hardly knowing what she did, she picked up a little bit of stick, and held it out to the puppy.

* * *

Chapter V
The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence.

Chapter V
-"You are old, Father William," the young man said, "And your hair has become very white; And yet you incessantly stand on your head - Do you think, at your age, it is right?"

Chapter V
"You are old," said the youth, "as I mentioned before, And have grown most uncommonly fat; Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door - Pray, what is the reason of that?"

Chapter V
"You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak For anything tougher than suet; Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak - Pray, how did you manage to do it?"

Chapter V
"You are old," said the youth, "one would hardly suppose That your eye was as steady as ever; Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose - What made you so awfully clever?"

* * *

Chapter VI
The Fish-Footman began by producing from under his arm a great letter, nearly as large as himself, and this he handed over to the other, saying, in a solemn tone, "For the Duchess. An invitation from the Queen to play croquet."

Chapter VI
The door led right into a large kitchen, which was full of smoke from one end to the other: the Duchess was sitting on a three-legged stool in the middle, nursing a baby; the cook was leaning over the fire, stirring a large cauldron which seemed t be full of soup.

Chapter VI
The baby grunted again, and Alice looked very anxiously into its face to see what was the matter with it. There could be no doubt that it had a very turn-up nose, much more like a snout than a real nose; also its eyes were getting extremely small for a baby: altogether Alice did not like the look of the thing at all.

Chapter VI
And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself, "if one only knew the right way to change them" - when she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off.

Chapter VI
Alice was not much surprised at this, she was getting so used to queer things happening. While she was looking at the place where it had been, it suddenly appeared again.

* * *

Chapter VII
There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head.

Chapter VII
"Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter, "You might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

Chapter VII
This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off: the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her: the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot.

* * *

Chapter VIII
A large rose-tree stood near the entrance of the garden: the roses growing on it were white, but there were three gardeners at it, busily painting them red.

Chapter VIII
The Queen turned crimson with fury, and, after glaring at her for a moment like a wild beast, screamed, "Off with her head! Off" - "Nonsense!" said Alice, very loudly and decidedly, and the Queen was silent.

Chapter VIII
The chief difficulty Alice found at first was in managing her flamingo: she succeeded in getting its body tucked away, comfortably enough, under her arm, with its legs hanging down, but generally, just as she had got its neck nicely straightened out, and was going to give the hedgehog a blow with its head, it would twist itself round and look up in her face, with such a puzzled expression that she could not help bursting out laughing.

Chapter VIII
"Well, it must be removed," said the King very decidedly, and he called the Queen, who was passing at the moment, "My dear! I wish you would have this cat removed!" The Queen had only one way of settling all difficulties, great or small. "Of with his head!" she said, without looking round. "I'll fetch the executioner myself," said the King eagerly, and he hurried off.

* * *

Chapter IX
"You can't think how glad I am to see you again you dear old thing!" said the Duchess, as she tucked her arm affectionately into Alice's, and they walked off together.

Chapter IX
They very soon came upon a Gryphon, lying fast asleep in the sun.

Chapter IX
"I'll tell it her," said the Mock Turtle in a deep, hollow, tone: "sit down, both of you, and don't speak a word till I've finished."

Chapter IX
"We had the best of educations - in fact, we went to school every day".

* * *

Chapter X
"Tis the voice of the Lobster; I heard him declare, "You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair." As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes."

* * *

Chapter XI
Near the King was the White Rabbit, with a trumpet in one hand, and a scroll of parchment in the other.

Chapter XI
The first witness was the Hatter. He came in with a teacup in one hand and a piece of bread-and-butter in the other.

Chapter XI
"You may go," said the King; and the Hatter hurriedly left the court, without even waiting to put his shoes on.

* * *

Chapter XII
"Here!" cried Alice, quite forgetting in the flurry of the moment how large she had grown in the last few minutes, and she jumped up in such a hurry that she tipped over the jury-box with the edge of her skirt, upsetting all the jurymen on to the heads of the crowd below, and there they lay sprawling about, reminding her very much of a globe of gold-fish she had accidentally upset the week before.

Chapter XII
At this moment the King, who had been for some time busily writing in his note-book, called out "Silence!" and read out from his book, "Rule Forty-two. All persons more than a mile high to leave the court."

Chapter XII
"Who cares for you?" said Alice (she had grown to her full size by this time). "You're nothing but a pack of cards!"



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